Media and politics in China’s ‘War on Words’

China’s state media is ramping up its use of the internet to fight a campaign against what it considers “fake news.”

 But the country’s biggest social media site, Sina Weibo, is facing criticism for not doing enough to block access to certain news stories and even using its own platforms to publish them.

 The Chinese government has cracked down on what it calls “fake” news websites in recent months, banning them from the Internet and other forms of online content, while some news sites have been blocked from accessing Google, Facebook and Twitter.

The government also has a “War on Truth” website that can be used to spread rumors and accusations.

While some sites and social media platforms in China have been accused of censorship, other outlets have been allowed to run on the platforms and, in some cases, have reported on what they said.

“Some sites have reported what the government wants to suppress,” said Zhang Shufang, a professor of Chinese studies at the University of California, Irvine.

Zhang told CNN that Chinese government officials are not only trying to control online discussion, they also have their own “war on truth.”

“We don’t see what the war on truth is, but what it is is what they want to suppress, and they are going after this particular type of information,” he said. 

“They don’t like the truth.”

Zhang said some media outlets are trying to use the “War On Truth” tool to spread “rumors, innuendo and propaganda” that can then be used against people or even nations.

But some have reported that the government has not cracked down hard on “fake and fraudulent news” websites.

A Sina Weiquizhuo news website, for instance, reported on a government crackdown on the publication of “fake, fake and fraudulent” news about a military test-launch in January.

One Weibo user wrote: “Fake news is a kind of information that the authorities use to control the news media and the public.

It is not news that is important.

It does not concern anyone.

It’s the government’s way of controlling the media.”

Zhao Shuyin, an assistant professor of journalism at Fudan University in Shanghai, said that the crackdown on media has “stalled” for a while, and that the country is not seeing any major change in the way the media operates.

He said that some of the new rules do seem to have an effect.

As long as the media is not spreading “fake or fraudulent news,” Zhao said, it will not be affected.

In fact, Zhao said the government is looking for new ways to crack down on the internet.

And in an attempt to combat misinformation, Zhao added, the government recently ordered news websites to post a notice about the new regulations and how to use it on the sites.

It is the first time China has ordered the news websites, Zhao told CNN, and said that he believes the government may be looking for ways to limit the news sites’ reach.

This kind of move by the government, Zhao noted, is “quite bold.”

However, he said the idea is to “maintain some control” and to keep the news outlets from spreading “false information.”

“The government is trying to create an illusion of control,” Zhao added.

For Zhao, the “war” on the news is also a way to try to control and control Chinese society.

“People are not willing to believe that they can say what they need to say,” Zhao told The Times.

That’s because they don’t know how to speak to people in real life, he added.