New rules for news outlets that don’t adhere to media self identification rules

New rules are coming into effect for media outlets that self-identify as “news organizations,” according to a memo sent to the media by the Department of Justice.

The memo, obtained by The Hill, outlines the new requirements for media organizations that self identify as “newsworthy” or “content” outlets.

They must publish content and information on a regular basis, as well as make available a public platform for those who wish to participate.

In other words, this means that outlets that are owned and operated by the government must provide a platform to the public.

But some media outlets are breaking the rules, according to the memo. 

“Some media outlets have chosen to remain online and in self-censorship, with the result that they are not publishing news or newsworthy information, even when it is important,” the memo reads.

“As a result, the public may not have access to news from such outlets, as they are unable to access information they require in order to conduct their news reporting.”

The memo also says that “many media outlets” are “not publishing news on a timely basis” and “they have failed to provide sufficient notice to readers about the change in policies.”

Some outlets, like The Associated Press, have posted their first daily content in months.

They’ve been “notifying readers of changes in policy and procedures, and posting on their websites, but they have not published their first news item in the past week,” the DOJ memo reads, referring to the daily newspaper.

The AP has been on a self-imposed self-destruct program, as it announced it would shut down its website and print no more content on Sunday, according a spokesman.

The company is expected to return to its traditional newsroom in mid-July, the spokesman said.

The DOJ memo cites a report from The Associated House, a news organization based in Washington, D.C., that found the average news site on Facebook was now more than 5,000 posts a day.

The AP is now reporting a monthly average of over 10,000.

The Trump administration has been ramping up its push against press freedom in recent months, targeting journalists and even issuing subpoenas.

But critics say the crackdown has been fueled by the White House, which has been pushing the idea that journalists are too liberal.