Why do people need to delete Facebook?

Social media is an increasingly popular way for users to communicate and interact online.

But, in many cases, users have not only deleted Facebook, but also deleted a large number of other social media accounts that they’ve used to promote themselves.

In some cases, they’ve also created new accounts to hide their identity or to mask their location.

Now, a new survey conducted by a research firm shows that Facebook users who have created new profiles have significantly fewer friends than those who haven’t.

The survey, conducted by the University of Washington, found that only 8 percent of those who created new Facebook accounts reported having at least 10 friends.

By comparison, 33 percent of people who hadn’t created new social media profiles reported having 10 or more friends.

That means nearly half of those Facebook users have no friends.

In addition, the survey found that almost half of people created new Twitter accounts had only two friends.

Only 5 percent of them had 10 or fewer friends.

A study conducted last year by researchers at the University at Buffalo found that when people deleted their social media and deleted other social networking sites, they lost more than $4 billion in advertising revenue.

But that study, which was funded by the National Science Foundation, found a different result: People who deleted their accounts didn’t lose anything.

The study, titled “The Effect of Self-Destruct on Online Presence,” is the first study of its kind that compares people’s experience with deleting Facebook, Twitter and other social networks.

It’s based on a survey of more than 2,000 people, including nearly 1,000 who deleted Facebook accounts.

The researchers surveyed nearly 600 people in five U.S. cities between February and May.

The report found that the vast majority of people didn’t experience any negative consequences for deleting their accounts, with only 3 percent of respondents reporting a negative effect.

However, the majority of those respondents who reported a negative impact did so on Facebook, according to the report.

People who deleted social media were more likely to say they felt happier, and were less likely to use social media in general, compared to people who didn’t delete their accounts.

That’s because people who deleted accounts were more apt to use Facebook and Twitter more than those that didn’t, the study found.

But the survey also found that Facebook and other Facebook-like services were still used by people, despite being the least popular social networks, when compared to other social platforms.

And when it came to the other services, people who created a new account also were more than twice as likely to have friends.

People were more inclined to use Instagram and Snapchat, which are both popular photo-sharing platforms, than Facebook and the other social services, according the survey.

People are also more likely than non-users to use Pinterest and LinkedIn, which allow people to share their personal information and images on the platform, according a study published in December by researchers from MIT, Carnegie Mellon and the University College London.

The research suggests that people aren’t necessarily going to delete their Facebook accounts just to avoid the stigma associated with social media.

Instead, they may be avoiding the social media platforms for more than just the potential negative consequences that the companies may face.